Read the Catalog Online - Now
126 Page 2014 Supplement

Questions? LIVE CHAT

#400 Wedge Sole

More Views

  • #400 Wedge Sole
  • #400 Speed Lace/Cord-lock System
  • #400 Buckle System
  • After 5 years use, 50,000 miles
  • Wedge Sole
  • Cleated Sole

Aerostich Combat Touring Boots #400-480

Availability: In stock

$387.00

* Required Fields

$387.00

Details

The tougher your riding, the better this boot will feel. Combat Touring boots are as strong as the bulkiest specialized off-road footwear, yet are designed to fit easily under your pants for everyday wear. As soon as you put them on you will feel more support and protection than ordinary street boots can offer.
Combat Touring boots are manufactured exclusively for us by Sidi using the best materials and their most experienced bootmakers. They feature quality full grain leather throughout, a Davos competition motocross sole, Scotchlite™ reflective in the heel gusset, generous internal ankle and toe padding, and a special padded collar at the top.
The inner speed lace/cord lock setup with micro-adjustable arch buckle and outer hook & loop calf closure insures a protective, comfortable fit. Combat Touring boots may take slightly longer to form to your feet compared to cheaper boots, but they will outlast them by years.
From time to time, apply any good waterproofing product and they will mostly eliminate the need for carrying rain boots.
Whenever regular motocross boots are too clumsy and street boots are too wimpy, these are perfect. Black.14" tall (2.7 lb. per boot) Medium Width. Wedge or cleated sole. 7.5, 8.5, 9.5, 10, 11, 11.5, 12.5, 13.5, 14, 15.

Boot Sizing Guide
How To Fit Combat Touring Boot
Combat Touring Boots Owners Guide
More About Combat Touring Boots (Deeper info for nerds...)

Additional Information

More Info Combat Touring Boot Owners Manual
How To Fit Combat Touring Boot

The brief CBT History...

These were the first general purpose riding boot of this style in the world. Their origination story is simple: We wanted a basic old-fashioned heavy-duty rider's boot that provided support like an MX boot, was fast and easy to get in and out of,and held onto one's foot well -- but without all the added-on MX boot armor. More supportive than the classic 'engineer' style boot, and much heavier-duty than the typical zippered race, street or touring boot. A de-contented MX boot.

In hindsight it's hard to believe that twenty five years ago there wasn't anything else like this available. The CBT boot was the original. A new type of hybrid existing halfway between a street boot and an off road boot. It created an entirely new product category.

After about ten years we'd sold a good number of them and (also as 'adventure' style bikes became more popular) other boot companies started to make their versions of the CBT boot. Even Sidi came out with a version. All these subsequent versions from others were more complicated or 'improved' in some way: More buckles, pleated areas, waterproof liners, etc. The others wanted to be able to say they were better than the CBT boot.

This is like the way designer jeans manufacturers sometimes say they are better than original Wrangler's, Lee, and Levi's 501's maybe. Every market works like this. There's an original...and if it's successful there are others that are similar but supposedly 'improved' in some way.

Mr. Subjective 11-13

CBT Boot Break-In:

Breaking them in? I did it last week, to have a pair to leave with a motorcycle I co-own in Arizona. This was the fourth time in twenty years I've had to break in a pair. I ride in the third pair every day. The first pair are still in use by a friend, after 20 years. They were the prototypes. The second pair are also in use.  My feet got longer and this pair went to another friend. This time and the last time (#3 and #4) I soaked the boots in a sinkful of water, let them drip dry for a couple of hours, then went for a two mile walk in them. And got blisters. Then I left them for several days to air dry fully, with the tops propped open with a chopstick. The I oiled the folds and hinge lines, and let that soak in for a couple of days. Now I've worn them for about the last week on a motorcycle trip (I'm in the middle of it now...) and they are perfect. I added our fancy semi-orthotic insole and I'm set for life, probably. A pair in MN and this pair which will stay in Arizona...

Executive Summary: They need two things: 1. A two week break-in, starting with soaking overnight in water, draining for an hour, walking in them wet for a couple of miles, then slow drying for several days, propped open.  Then lightly lubricating the hinge folds (or the whole boot) with a soak-in leather dressing. 2. A higher quality insole. I use the more expensive of the two we sell.  The standard insole is not supportive enough for me.

Mr. Subjective 12/09
X

Receive advance product news, exclusive deals and special sale offers first!

* indicates required